A Synthesis and Systematic Review of Policies on Training and Deployment of Human Resources for Health in Rural Africa

The WHO/PAHO Collaborating Centre on Health Workforce Planning & Research, in partnership with the University of Zambia School of Medicine, is pleased to share its most recent report: A Synthesis and Systematic Review of Policies on Training and Deployment of Human Resources for Health in Rural Africa. We would like to thank our international Advisory Group and the Global Health Research Initiative for supporting this important work.

The vast majority of African countries are enduring a human resources for health (HRH) crisis, with most countries on the continent lacking sufficient personnel to deliver basic health care to their populations, especially in rural areas. Specifically, maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) has been identified as a high priority in many policy and planning discussions, with the post-2015 agenda looking to address the proven challenges in meeting MNCH Millennium Development Goals, 4 and 5.

This highlights an urgency for a strong, evidence-based policy process in order to best utilize the scarce HRH for the delivery of basic health care to improve the regions most vulnerable populations of mothers, newborns and children, specifically in rural and remote areas. However, most country-level policy makers are hindered in their ability to apply evidence to such HRH policies, as the necessary resources to review and synthesize available information on the implementation and impact of policies in the region are not readily available.

In an effort to address this issue, assist in informing such policy planning, and explore other challenges and opportunities in the realm of African HRH policies, a systematic review and in-depth analysis of available peer- and non-peer-reviewed literature, as well as unpublished government policy documents on the training and deployment of doctors, nurses, and midwives for maternal-child care in rural Africa, was completed. The scoping review and synthesis covered all African countries with English, French or Portuguese as their national language, while the in-depth policy analysis addressed a smaller sub-set of countries: Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. Underpinning this research were on-going consultations with our African-centred Advisory Group and capacity building activities with the Zambian research partners.

Key learnings from the synthesis process indicated a pressing need to increase HRH research and policy capacity in the countries studied and the importance of collaborative partnerships between and among countries and agencies to inform knowledge development and exchange. It is our hope that the dissemination and expansion of this research and the continued engagement and collaboration with African researchers and policy-makers will be critical mechanisms for addressing the identified issues and are essential to strengthen Africa’s health systems and capacity to meet MDGs 4 and 5 post-2015 through the increased presence of trained HRH in rural areas.

The full-length report is available for download, as well as executive summaries of the work in English, French, and Portuguese. If you have any questions, comments or feedback on the report, please feel free to contact the WHO/PAHO Collaborating Centre or leave a comment below.

Full report: A Synthesis and Systematic Review of Policies on Training and Deployment of HRH in Rural Africa

Executive Summary – English:Executive Summary – A Synthesis and Systematic Review of Policies on Training and Deployment of Human Resources for Health in Rural Africa

Executive Summary – French: Rapport Sommaire Synthèse et examen systématique – Politiques sur la formation et le déploiement de ressources humaines en santé en Afrique rurale

Executive Summary – Portuguese: Relatório Sumário Sintese e revisão sistemática- Politicas sobre formação e distribuição de RHS na África rural

 

WHO CC
By on June 6, 2014 Last modified on October 31st, 2016 at 1:19 pm
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